postural assessment & taking posture photos

I’m using my own postural photos to demonstrate (a bit simplistically!) my thought process during a client assessment.

 

The outcome of the client assessment and what I see in their posture then dictates what exercises are best suited to that individual client and we will see how their body responds during a session.

 

It might be that we need to go back to the drawing board and re-assess but the postural assessment is where we start as it gives us many clues as to what is not working properly.

 

When taking ‘posture photos’ you need :

 

1. To be barefoot.

2. To get your head and feet fully in.

3. To get a photo from front, back and both sides (4 photos total).

4. To take the photos flat on (so not looking up/down at you – this distorts what we see).

5. To be relaxed and holding no tension. Feel like you’re standing if you would if you were on your own, not posing for a photo.

6. Try and get a blank wall behind you as this helps us see things better.

7. Hair tied up and in as few clothes as you feel comfortable with!

postural assessment

front view

1. Elevated L Pelvis = likely to be tightness in iliapsoas and quadratus lumborum on elevated side.

2. Valgus Knee Stress = likely to be weakness in the abductors of the hip.

3. Internally rotated/hinged shoulder (front of hand showing) = likely to be weakness in the rhomboids.

right view

4. Posterior Pelvic Tilt = likely to be issue with weak quads, spinal erectors and iliapsoas.

5. Forward Head = likely to be issue with weakness around shoulder girdle and thoracic spine.

left view

4. Posterior Pelvic Tilt = likely to be issue with weak quads, spinal erectors and iliapsoas. 5. Forward Head = likely to be issue with weakness around shoulder girdle and toracic spine.

back view

6. L Forward Thoracic Rotation (displayed by disparity in hand placement) = likely to be issue with spinal erector function. 7. Pronated ankles = likely to be weakness in the muscles around the hips and calf.

 

(N.B – There’s a spectrum of severity when it comes to these postural deviations and, all things considered, I’m not particularly severe with any of the deviations I present with.)